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Twin-Control aims to develop a simulation system that integrates the different aspects that affect machine tool and machining performance, including lifecycle concepts, providing better estimation of machining performance than single featured simulation packages. This holistic simulation model will be linked to the real machines in order to update itself according to their real condition and to perform control actions that will lead to performance improvements.

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Twin-Control 33M meeting at COMAU, France

Last week (July 4 and 5) members of the Twin-Control consortium gathered at COMAU’s headquarters located in Castres, France, for the 33-month plenary meeting.

During the meeting, partners checked the status of the industrial evaluation process that is being done at this stage of the project. In addition, recent activities and final steps in dissemination and exploitation were discussed. Read more

Virtual Machining and Optimization Workshop at Sheffield (AMRC): Summary and video

The Virtual Machining and Optimization Workshop, coorganized by the AMRC and Twin-Control, took place on March 1, 2018. The workshop consisted of presentations and an on-machine demonstration of a new online simulation and measurement capability developed on a Starrag Ecospeed machine tool in the Twin-control project.

70 people registered to the event. Due to adverse weather conditions on the day, the workshop was relocated to the Holiday Inn Royal Victoria Hotel. In spite of the weather conditions, 35 people attended the workshop in person and around 30 people joined via link call. Read more

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Technology Watch

FAG VarioSense Bearings

Source: Schaeffler

FAG VarioSense bearings — a combination of a standard rolling bearing and a sensor cluster — provide several sensor signals for monitoring machines and processes in one compact unit. And they offer a combination of different measured values which can be adapted to specific applications in a standard envelope.

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Smart manufacturing must embrace big data

Source: Nature magazine

Manufacturing is getting smart. Companies are increasingly using sensors and wireless technologies to capture data at all stages of a product’s life. These range from material properties and the temperatures and vibrations of equipment to the logistics of supply chains and customer details. Truck engines beam back data on speed, fuel consumption and oil temperature to manufacturers and fleet operators. Optical scanners are used to spot defects in printed electronics circuits1.

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